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during the holiday season and consumers make up 70% of the u.s. economy. during the holiday-shortened week the markets moved in tandem for the fiscal cliff. up more midweek. the markets continued to climb on friday. stunning accusations that one of america's iconic companies hewlett-packard which acquired autonomy last year for $11 billion is accusing autonomy of what it called serious improprieties in its bookkeeping and inflating its own value. meg witman says the company lied about how much it was worth. >> we believe there's a willful effort on the part of certain members of autonomy management to mislead shareholders when they were a publicly held companies and mislead buyers including hp and we stand by the forensic review we have seen. as you know, we have turned it over to the fcc. >> we are shocked. we have been pretty ambushed by this today. first we heard about it was a press release and we refute them. they are factually incorrect. we'd like to learn more about them. i'm afraid the details haven't been shared with us. >> reporter: autonomy ceo said the company fo
and extend the maturity of existing loans. mark carney prepares to take up the reigns of the uk economy any. unlikely to be any good news. third quarter gd figures expected to be revised down. and it's point, click, buy. americans were doing plenty of that yesterdays as early reports suggest online holiday sales soared on cyber monday. and all bets are off. prediction market entrade says it can no longer accept u.s. customers as market regulators say its trades aren't legal. shanghai composite closed below 2,000 for the first time in three years. it comes at a time when plenty have been talking up chinese growth prospects for next year. so we'll get into that more later. but 1991 is the closing level. this the main one to watch across asia. the nikkei did manage to continue it rally adding about 0.4% as the yen weakens on comments this morning. forex, the dollar-yen one to watch, 82.19 is the level there. the aussie dollar doing a little bit abouter despite that weak number on the shanghai composite. sterling is flat. we'll get into that more later. and euro-dollar just barely higher today,
to disincentivize the economy and being too restrictive and cut off growth. it would be easy if there was a right and wrong. everything is right here so it is a matter of judgment, what proportion you come back in these things. but i think both sides have to be touched in this, entitlements have to be touched and revenue has to be touched. >> that's the message lloyd blankfein is delivering right now to members of congress on the hill and what he'll say to the president later on today. >>> as eamon mentioned, the president will not only meet with mr. blankfein but a number of other ceos at the white house later today to sell that fiscal cliff plan to them. president earlier today out speaking about it. our chief washington correspondent john harwood is live at the white house with some details on that. hi, john. >> reporter: hi, sue. i echo eamon. i think wall street ought to pay a little bit less attention to the statements that are coming out every day because we've got a long way to go on this roller coaster ride. we've got a live picture of jay carney briefing at the white house right now. th
's really thinking that we're going to get this full 3.5%, 4% gdp hit smack into the economy on january 1st. the problem is that time is marching on. we've had the election, we've had thanksgiving. the excuses are running out. the lame-duck session is only so long. that's probably why the markets are getting nervous. although you may get a deal done in q-1 rather than in q-4, the fact that it actually hits from january 1st is going to keep business very cautious, very defensive and that's going to worry the equity market. >> it's interesting because it also comes against the landscape where we've seen chinese equities underperform, they reminded us very few of its member countries have great growth prospects going forward. that's probably wise. people are saying why is it that across the globe the u.s. fiscal cliff is such an issue. well, it's because sources of growth at this point are few and far between. >> that is the problem. where is growth going to come from. the one place that looked set for a reasonable 2013 was the u.s. economy. europe flat, china slower probably than this year. b
about the german economy. suggests we may be heading into possibly contraction territory. expecting it to be around 99.5 versus 100. expectations entex is frft at 93.2, unchanged from the previous reading. not out yet. kathleen brooks is with us. i'm not sure why we don't have it but anyway, whatever your expectations are for this, how close is germ 234i going to skirt with contraction in the fourth quarter? >> it certainly has been slowing down and it looks like there's the possibility that even germany is starting to have some mild contraction and maybe even in the technical recession i would think over the next two quarters. the economic indicators have been coming down in determine any, there had been an expectation that consumption kicks up more in the country. which it has a little bit, but a little less than maybe people have been expecting. obviously the fallout from the international crisis and the backdrop is not really helping. >>. >> euro-dollar edging up to a three week high. growth numbers don't seem to mary ann awful lot to the traders. >> no. it's been able to shrug
's the one that's most beneficial for our economy. >> reporter: larry, what i would say is tax increases does not necessarily, despite the rhetoric on both sides, and especially from democrats, does not necessarily have to mean increases in tax rates. it is possible, if you look at the estate tax, if you look at the treatment of dividends, capital gains and carried interest and take a look at loopholes and deductions to raise a significant amount of revenue from people at the top without changing the marginal rate, layery. >> very interesting. we're going to have senator tom coburn on that very subject later in the show. many thanks to john harwood coming from washington, d.c. now, with everyone in washington talking tax hikes, whatever happened to spending cuts? that's really my question. spending cuts and limited government and private sector free enterprise and growth. here now is cnbc contributor and democratic vat gist keith boykin, a former clinton white house aide and best selling author and talk show host larry elder, out with a new took, "dear father, dear son." larry already the sho
this drags on, the uncertainty continues to hurt the economy and continues to undermine markets. >> james nixon, thank you. autonomy's ceo says he's shocked by allegations of mismanagement. they've been forced to take a nearly $9 billion charge because of what it called serious improprieties. lynch says the trouble arose after hp took over the company. >> we've been talking about a massive elephant in the room that wasn't spotted. the reason it wasn't spotted is very simple, it wasn't there. it was done, in their own words, meticulously and great detail. and then they actually ran the company, including doing all of the books for the last four quarters. >> hp shares down 12% yesterday, closing on a ten-year low right now. that is the euro's closing price. >>> still to come later, he's now apologized to the investors for the poor call and says the end for hp is not even sight. >>> also, japan has posted its worst trade deficit in october for more than three decades. exports dropped sharply amid territorial tensions between tokyo and beijing. it indicates the world's third biggest economy i
trying to ruin the holidays and the economy for everybody? >> first up this evening tonight fed chairman ben bernanke gave a warning fix the fiscal cliff or we are headed for a severe recession, so far, no concrete proposals and i have to ask again, are we headed for a stalemate or can we find an economy saving common ground. let's talk. we have abigail disney. we'll have a sudden fiscal cliff? >> i worry about the damage that mighting done in fixing it. you don't think the tax increases that could come at the end of the year and the spending cuts of less 100 build, you don't think those would in deuce a severe recession and everybody on wastreet? >> they are not that big of rate increases so far. welcome to the show and what would you do about it? >> they are proposing letting the bush tax cuts stand for everyone because the top 2%. if you raise them and closing the interest loop hole, fixing the estate tax you come out to $100 trillion in savings. >> serious question, you have a famous name and we welcome you onto the program. do you record that as rich? >> what i regard is irrelevant
of all, interest rates are low because we have had a weak economy. as far as the debt goes, listen to dean, i'm sure that he believes that the only real problem phafacing the country a the capitol gains. i think we do have a debt problem i think we have a big debt problem. the numbers in the 20s, 30s, look horrifying and we have a huge job and growth problem. i don't understand how taking dividends from 15-43 creates jobs that closes that. >> i don't see spending cuts. it won't matter. the economy collapsed and the housing bubble collapsed. make them pay zero taxes. the search goes inside out. none of it finds that it will create any of those jobs. the government has no choice. >> that is quite an experiment. that you are willing to run with 1 or 2%. from 15 to 25. we are going to taking it from 15 to 30. >> we have been there. >> you are taking the rate on capital which we have the world's highest rate on capital. and you are poi inggoing to mak higher? i would love to see spending reductions. the house and the senate rotes for $1.2 trillion spending cut. that spending cut would b
there will also be a drag on the american economy if our budget deficit widens out forever, if we're irresponsible and governor doesn't work. left with those four choices, think think -- on the flip side, did republicans ask you to spend any nuts -- i think at this point both sides have acknowledged that there's going to be revenue concessions and entertainment concessions. in fact, if you listen to, it again, i'm not a master of the political art here, i'm in washington but i would say if you had these points of views in a business context, as close as they are, i would say a deal would be in reach. >> you see some fundamental level of optimism from lloyd blankfine but a long way to go with the combination of prief pressure and public pressure, like the president is going to exert before we actually go to the flight of fired. i asked the treasury secretary should the president return to wall street. he it must be someone who understands markets, marry. >> me have 33 days to -- head of all pi he told john harwood. marge i will hates have to go up somewhat. he said that's going to put a drag on the
to the financial system. >> steve, if only the market could focus on just the economy, which actually seems to be chugging along okay. if you look at durables, consumer confidence, the ongoing recovery and housing, it's the overhang of the cliff that's spooking everybody. >> yeah, we've had somewhat better numbers. the new home sales today, not great. maybe sandy affected even though the government said it wasn't. the economy's okay. it may be more of a 2% plus economy in the fourth quarter than is being given credit on the street. it's not gang busters. the question has been for a long time -- by the way, there's some headlines from the beige book. you can see it really did affect the northeast, new york, and new jersey especially. so we'll see some of that in the data in the months ahead. we'll be seeing some rebuilding going on. you know, i would not make a call here on the economy, scott, to say go ahead and invest in the economy. after the fiscal cliff everything is fine. i think there's a reason for cautious optimism, but i don't think there's a reason to think it's going to go gang b
spain to take the bailout, but of course many things can go wrong including the economy could be even worse than what we just discussed. in that case i think spain would ultimately have to apply. but i don't think they'll do that over the coming weeks. >> all right, ricardo, good to talk to you. thanks for that. don't forget, of course, if you have any thoughts, questions, comments, e-mail us at cnbc.com. it's thanksgiving to u.s. markets, so they're closed, so that means we have a special three hour show for european and asian viewers today. still to come, india's parliament has opened its winter's session for what could be a tough first day back to business for the prime minister. we'll find out what opposition he faces from our correspondent in mumbai. we'll also find out why asian casinos are putting their chips on the table despite slow economic growth in the region. and obama saves cobbler, but many of his turkey friends will end up on the table today. we evaluate the cost of a thanksgiving dinner with a soft commodities expert. all of that and lent more coming up over the cours
continue to believe that the u.s. economy is in pretty good shape. the consumer's in good shape. housing bottomed about 14, 15 months ago. companies like home depot, which recently exceeded expectations, raised long-term profitability goals, and portly, frank blake, who's orchestrated a great turnaround has noted that housing has finally gone from being a head wind to a tail wind. we like the asset management companies like waddell and reed. their flagship fund is in the eighth percentile year to date. industries and companies like retail, small banks, and home builders, we think are going to be good places to be as we go into the new year. >> all right. we will leave it there. rick santelli, final word from you on what drives fixed income and treasuries toward year end. same issues, i guess. >> well, i think next week, first of all, we have a gdp revision. second time around on third quarter. many are calling for a big upward revision from 2% to 2.8. if that actually happens, i think that would be a rather compelling reason outside of quiet holiday markets to see some sustained selling
swath of the economy, i can't stress how important this trend might be. hey, let's take the rails. >> all aboard! >> they've been horrendous in large part because of decline in coal shipments to our power plants which are nat gas. china is building hundreds of coal burning plants. when electricity is used, you'll see stocks like csx and norfolk southern start to bottom. you know what? i think they bottom now. just how powerful is china? consider this. last week we had a truce between the israelis and gazans. it took people by surprise. how can it stay high given the sudden ephemeral peace? oil didn't fall. that's because of rapacious chinese demand. there's europe. deal talks were in the air friday. that means a day when the industrials that had so much riding on return to growth in europe could blossom. they were some of the best actors out there. good news for europe, still good news for the international u.s. banks. they went up, too. jp morgan, goldman sachs. retail. we got terrific news on friday. initial returns from the black thursday which used to be black friday, tremendo
business, like the economy is doing well. he has known boehner for years and believes the speaker wants to make a deal with president obama to avoid the fiscal cliff and impact on families but also seen washington's disfunction and has his doubts. >> somewhat just like the president, time to go ahead and do your job. >> reporter: speaker boehner is secure enough in his own district here north of cincinnati i-75 that his constituents will give him a freehand to negotiate. his bigger challenge is pulling together republicans from districts across the country behind any deal he ultimately strikes with president obama. the next four weeks that is the challenge john boehner, eric canter, and candidates on the house and senate are going to find. how do you put together a deal that not only the leaders agree upon but members of the caucuses can give majority to us in both houses? >> indeed, john, thank you very much. >>> meantime, some important economic data came out today and if you were looking at it expecting to see signs of worry about that looming fiscal cliff, you might be surprised. st
and certainly the largest threat to the u.s. economy. >> meredith whitney was talking back in 2010 about a then- looming financial crisis involving state and local governments across the country. it was a debt crisis which some people believe could derail the recovery and require another big bailout package that no one in washington wants to talk about. >> the day of reckoning has arrived. that's it. and it's gonna arrive everywhere. time may vary a little bit depending upon which state you're in, but it's coming. [ticking] >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in this edition, we look at three stories linked by the financial collapse of 2008. first, we examine a scam that's cost thousands of americans their homes. then we look into wall street's shadow market of credit default swaps. finally, a report on the perilous state of state finances. we begin with the foreclosure crisis. in the aftermath of the great recession, the huge number of foreclosed properties was a significant factor in weighing down the economy. many were stuck on the market for an unexpected reason: the banks co
. we're entering a deflationary time and in the japanese economy which is evident to a lot of fundamentals we're seeing. and i think it will cause levels to drop further. >> they could actually just do old fashioned money printing. just put more bank notes and -- instead of buying government debt, they could do it the old fashioned way. >> that is definitely an option. i think they'll be trying every resource possible. i think there is just no demand for credit. you can flood the market, but who is there to demand it. >> so the yen strength is overdone. what does that mean for some of the other cost rates looking at euro-dollar now firmly in this range. is that in place for a while? >> i think we've seen a lot of range shading at the moment even in terms of the election, we see no reaction in euro-dollar. i do think we'll remain range trading right up up until the end of this quarter. the omt policy is really underpinned euro u.s. and created a floor under this currency. >> okay. good to see you. thanks for that. the financial services authority has hit ubs with a 27.9 mill
on the top 2% of households and it's not going to hurt the economy one bit. >> oh, that part i won't -- >> it's got to be part of the deal. >> that's part of the deal. >> before you answer that, art, i want to say, a second issue. let's put it right on table since jared opened up. many people believe since the president's budget want $1.6 trillion -- $1.6 trillion, of revenues, over ten years. >> over the next ten years, to be clear. >> next ten years. he will wish to raise the top tax rates. that includes income taxes, cap gains, dividends and estate taxes. and art laffer, he will also wish to curb deductions so he will raise tax revenues as well as tax rates and art, that sets the stage for a stalemate politically. what does it do economically also? >> well, it does set the stage politically. by not doing anything, all the tax rates go up on everyone. that's for sure. so, the question is, the republicans will pass a bill that extends all the tax cuts. i mean, that they will go along with no problem. they won't go along with a double wammy and they shouldn't. this is obama's economy. this is
? >> if you look at what might happened, in other words, we go from an environment where the economy is chugging along, uninspiring but growing 2%, to go over the fiscal cliff which means for that period when we're over the fiscal cliff, contracting, that suggests that multiples come down probably as much as 10%. in addition you're likely to see drop in earnings estimates as well. some real risk if we go over the cliff. >> a lot. >> michael, you're not as concerned about the impact of the fiscal cliff on the markets. why? >> first of all, i don't think we'll go over the cliff. i think it's a lower probability we will not rather than we will. here's where i think you need to position a portfolio strategy. i don't think the market is priced in if we go over the cliff. what you need to do is be in risk assets, if this makes sense, more defense risk assets. dividend payers, technology, even overseas, emerging markets. china looks like it's finally starting to recover because the bottom line is, even if we don't go over the fiscal cliff, we'll still have a very, very slow growth environme
's the one most beneficial for our economy. >> reporter: the president's trying to take advantage of that different tone. he talked to speaker boehner over the weekend by telephone. and today you've had two business leaders, john engler, tom donahue, in to meet with senior white house officials. they're trying to keep this going. aides on capitol hill tell me no substantive progress in negotiations just yet. they're just now getting back to work after thanksgiving. >> how does that make you feel about the market? does it make you feel like they have more kum-bi-ya going on in washington, d.c.? does it make you more willing to invest? >> i'll tell you what. i saw spielberg's "lincoln" over the weekend and it was incredible because it reminded me how nothing has changed on capitol hill. >> i agree with you 150%. >> in 150 years. >> don't you get tired of everybody saying, oh, washington is a mess right now. it's never been this bad. it's always been this bad. you see that in the movie. >> well, we had a civil war in the -- >> some say it's never been worse. it's been worse. >> go ah
of the pattern for the s&p 500. lower than less than three points. >> so with all the good news on the economy out today, still no rally for stocks. is it really still all about the fiscal cliff for investors right now? let's talk about that in our clo"closing bell" exchange. steve liesman will have breaking news momentarily. steve, do you have that? >> yes, i do. what we have is a report from the new york fed on consumer finance. what the news shows is that overall, consumer credit outside of real estate is up just a bit. most of that, by the way, is student loan debt, being up about $42 billion inside that $2.7 trillion number. overall, mortgage debt is down and overall debt is down. the basic gist of the details, bill, is that consumer credit continues to decline overall. delinquencies are down and bankruptcies are down. balance sheet repair continues. a little bit more willingness of the consumer to take on some debt and a lot of it -- >> that's very interesting, steve. let me ask you something, david. >> i want to make one more point, which is that when you talk about how much the dow is
.s. treasury department is now stopping short of labeling the world's second biggest economy a currency manipulator. the white house is expected now to send the congress a multi-billion-dollar request on the recovery from superstorm sandy. the storm caused an estimated $71 billion in damages in new york and new jersey, and some congressional aides saying the request for funding would likely be at least $11 billion. the move comes as canada gets close to its decision on whether to approve the transaction. the energy companies say discussions with the committee are still in progress, and of course they had to file approval because they have extensive operations in the u.s. gulf of mexico. >>> "the wall street journal" reporting that virtue is emerging as the frontrunner to buy knight capital. they would possibly sell off parts of that business. finally, we can't get away from the story of twinkies. the bakers union of hostess brands wants a bankruptcy judge to appoint a chapter 11 trustee to ensure an orderly winddown. the union is saying it objects the allowing incumbent management to su
yet, with whispers of possibly the fed stimulating the economy even further, and with economic data pouring in almost daily that suggests we're still sputtering along? >> well, i tend to think 2013s going to be a great year. i'm not just looking at housing and employment. i'm looking at the architectural building index. there's stuff in the draw room. they're ready to bid out this winter and break ground in the spring. the republicans know that. the democrats know that. i would agree with rick. right now it's hard to imagine they can come up with something. we know they can. we know the democrats can say, okay, we'll give you something on means testing entitlements and we'll move the social security age up. republicans will say, we'll get rid of second mortgage deductions. they can do it. i don't think they really want to do it yet. so we just sit here sort of up 100, down 100. you know, just stand on the sidelines and wait until they figure it out. >> ryan, how are you allocating capital as we watch these gyrations on a daily basis because of comments out of capitol hill? >> the bo
40. >> if you're trying to forecast the economy, what matters is what america actually decides, not what it should decide. what it's actually going to decide is a small bargain that gets us through 2013 and doesn't fix the problem. that's the reality that we're going to face. >> so your gdp under that scenario for 2013, 2014, 2015 -- >> yeah, for 2012, we'll have about two quarters of 1.5%. i think we'll get some resolution by mid year so we'll grow 2.5%, maybe 3%. >> mid year. >> yeah. and then in 2013, i think you can grow 3%, maybe more as long as you have -- >> if you just let it ride? >> that's my forecast. we're not going to fix these fundamental problems except over a ten year period with 10 or 15 pieces of legislation. >> medicare alone is 42 trillion unfunded. social security 20.5 trillion. and then you add the 16 that we know about to that. none of these are in black and white those first two that i mentioned. you add it all together, 86.8. >> a lot depends on what happens to medical care. i mean, one thing that could change these estimates tremendously, find a cure f
. we're always looking at geopolitical risks. it does play a part in the global economy. with slow global growth domestically and overseas, the last thing we need is another geopolitical crisis. >> fiscal cliff taking a backseat today. how are you allocating capital today? >> we're very cautious now, frankly. we have about a two-week window. i think the markets are being a bit accommodating, frankly, until we get more clarity. >> rick santelli, did you see any movement in the markets when they announced the cease fire? it had very specific impacts here and there, but wasn't a widespread thing, was it? >> no, it really wasn't. as a i talk, you can look at ten-year for every major developed economy. the u.s., the germans, the french, the u.k., the japanese. month to date, the patterns are almost all die dent call. with all these variables, elections, mideast, fiscal cliff, it seems as though there's only so much flight to safety bid you can push into the marketplace. some traders say that's why you didn't notice. in the old days, it would make a difference. yields are already most ac
strategy pay off for retailers? will concerns about the sluggish economy and the fiscal cliff keep consumers home? all questions we seek answers to. >> let's get some answers. cnbc contributor stacy liblet at queens center mall here in new york city. we also have liz dunn of mcquarry capital on the west coast in san francisco. great to have you all with us. laura, why don't i get to you first of all. what are you seeing out there on the floor of the malls? >> so traffic's slowing a little bit which is normal for the afternoon. i think that most of the traffic -- most of the big buys were for electronics and toys. those happened last night. they may be happening online more and more. but the mall's bit slow, we think, relative to a year ago. >> do you think people came in earlier with all of these earlier openings that we've been hearing about? do you feel maybe that's just drifted off a little bit as everyone's now done their shopping and gone loam to bed? >> i'm pretty sure that that is what has happened here. you don't normally see -- this is an urban mall in queens. i would not
consumer giving the economy a big lift or will fears about the fiscal cliff get in the way? a roundtable discussion is up next. you saw sears and kmart president kick off the open at the nasdaq. can his store ring up strong sales this holiday season? we'll head to break and look at this morning's early movers on wall street led by best buy up 1.6%. with the fidelity stock screener, you can try strategies from independent experts and see what criteria they use. such as a 5% yield on dividend-paying stocks. then you can customize the strategies and narrow down to exactly those stocks you want to follow. i'm mark allen of fidelity investments. the expert strategies feature is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so
? >> it's a very bifurcated economy today with the consumer. you have high end consumers that are still feeling pretty good but in very basic every day needs like food as well as basic services, et cetera, people no matter what economic strata they're in, they are trying to save on those basics. >> explains a lot about where we are. >> took my breath away. what he's saying is there's a huge percentage of people trying to pay for dinner and dinner is tough to come by and you forget about that on a fiscal cliff discussion that will be even more difficult for people to pay for dinner and he did this acquisition because he knows people are hurting in this country. >> there's the opening bell. s&p at the top of your screen. here's big board at that. prosperity bank shares marking transfer from the nasdaq and over at the nasdaq. >> you're talking about dinner. we are having discussion about whole foods under pressure of late. the company missed. the cfo resigned. never a good thing for a company when you hear a cfo resigning. stock down 18.25%. smaller cap company. it's 2.9 billion. decent ac
that central bankers can't rescue the u.s. economy if it goes over the fiscal cliff. paul is president of financial capital. given that we're talking about this so much with these guys not around, all we do is we keep showing how much time we have as it's ticking down. when they do get back, paul, how do you think that the deal looks if they do put one together, and do they get it done? >> good morning, and happy thanksgiving to y'all. we all know it's getting done, whether it gets done before christmas or in january, a deal's going to get done. i think also everyone knows taxes are unfortunately -- taxes are going to go up. i don't know it's going to be at the 250 level. maybe at the 500 or million-dollar level. but taxes are going to go up and expenses are going to get cut. so we all wish they would stop the jawboning and positioning and politicking, sit in a room with dulls, both give in a little bit and move on. but they're going to push and push and push and the markets will push a deal to get it done. >> so if you were trying to decide what to do, would you just stand pat with eq
have something really worked out because look at what the economy -- look at where consumer sentiment is over the last couple months. i don't think they can really, you know, run the risk of that falling back. we made so much improvement over the last couple months. at least macroeconomicly, they can't run the risk of this thing going over. >> what does it mean for the stock market and how many different things are affecting it right now? i figure not knowing where tax policy is next year, some people know it will be hire, so they're probably just going to sell into december 31st. and then you've got continuing problems in europe, as well, morgan stanley has a report out about possible recession in 2013. what are the factors that influence the market at 13,000 and do you think it's a good time to ad money or take money out? >> short term, i think the feeling is that things are going to work out. so we'll be in this range here of in the s&ps 1390, 1420. i think if we break 1390, we get down to that next 1360 level will, again, there is so much money on the sidelines waiting to do somet
as the eu and imf agree on terms of debt sustainability. where does it leave the greek economy which has already shrunk by nearly a fifth? >>> and warren buffett on tv this morning saying he wouldn't sell a single share of stock even if he was guaranteed the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff. just wait until you hear who he thinks should be the treasury secretary. >> we'll begin of course with the deal of the day. conagra foods has agreed to acquire ralcorp for $5 billion. $90 a share in cash. 28% premium to the closing price on monday. kayla tausche reported on potential for a deal between the two companies back in 2011. it creates the largest private label food company in north america. this is a big deal. >> yes, it is. it's big in size in terms of what we've seen in this market. look how excited he is. and they finally got it done. it's been one as you pointed out that was around in 2011. they couldn't get it done. that is conagra. they walked away. ralcorp stock price fell dramatically. they split the post cereal division from ralcorp. the two trade separately. so you did have a compan
as expected, maybe management isn't executing. maybe economy takes a turn for the worse and suddenly your stock belongs to a sector that is out of favor. don't get sentimental. you got to sell. take a small loss and give a broken company a second chance to burn you and then take a much larger loss. lots of people hang on to the losers, often because they're waiting for them to get back to even selling. it's the worst kind of amateur mistake. but even then, these people know their losers deserve to be sold, they want to sell, they're just waiting too long for an unrealistic price that is too high given the downturn with the actual company. selling your losers seems to make perfect sense. selling your winners, though, that's totally counterintuitive for many of you. have to at least trim your biggest gainers. the first reason is simple, diversification. when you let your winners ride, your position can get too big. let's say you own a stock that doubled and doubled and doubled. maybe you bought apple that traded around 200. it represented 15%, it's now a much bigger piece of the pie, even i
.s. economy. i thinkist the moguling being throw in front of it, our self-inflected issues, you know, last time around we sequestration. are we going to have sequestration 2? of course we'll put a band-aid, but we need leverage to have reform predicated to surrender on the band-aid. >>> we've got to go, guys. i've got to go with this. we've got to move on. this is the last hour of trading, so we've got to move here. thank you for your thoughts today. steve, thank you, you're voting on a committee of politicians. i find hope in that somehow. >> yeah. you're in the hopeful camp. >> hoping at the last moment they will do the right thing. >> was that a pig that just flew by? the market is slowly coming off the lows. >> instead the last time the markets closed in positive territory on black friday was 2008. let's see if we can do it again. we have full team coverage of where it's shaping up to be a jolly holiday season. >> our luxury or discount retailers. >>> and walmart workers threatening to walk off the job. are these protests having a real impact, or was it a lot of noise? we'll speak to o
. >>> if lawmakers do not act to save the economy from falling off the fiscal cliff, $490 million would be cut from the centers for disease control and prevention's national breast and cervical cancer early detection program. which would result in over 33,000 fewer women screened for breast and cervical cancer. [ male announcer ] trading's like a high-speed train. and you don't want to miss it with thinkorswim by td ameritrade. you get knock-your-socks-off tools, simple one-click orders, real-time paper trading to hone your skills, plus anytime you need it support. ♪ stocks, options, futures, and forex. get your trading on track. thinkorswim by td ameritrade. trade commission free for 60 days, plus get up to $600 when you open an account. >>> lawmakers, their bellies full, are returning to washington after the thanksgiving break. the senate officially returns to work in 45 minutes. congressional leaders expected to meet with the president again this week as they try to rise above and come up with a deal to avert the fiscal cliff. on january 1st, of course, we would run off the cliff unless action
in new york city. to find out where they stand on the fiscal cliff and the economy. here's what they told her. >> everyone is concerned all around the world. i think it's going to take -- and i'm not an economist, but listening to what everyone says, people i have great respect for -- it's going to take time and so much depends on what happens in europe and in asia and it's not just what happens in the u.s. but i still think that shouldn't discourage people from wanting to succeed and i think they have to be confident that you can do well even in tough times. >> i think we're always a bit scared about where the economy is globally and i think i'm not different from that. we just hope that it gets back on the right track and hopefully that's where it's going. >> i think it really causes the entrepreneurial spirit to thrive because people are no longer looking at the old mechanisms and the old ways that people are worried about wall street so they're not looking at wall street as a road. when they're thinking about finance, they're thinking about it in other ways. when they're thinking abou
on the economy. take pbh. host of other brands you know. back on october 31st, we learned that pbh was acquiring a brand th for $2.9 billion. you have the house of chatral together. deals have always been perfect. pbh reported after the bell today and the results were very strong. the company reported strong earnings let's check in with the fabulous chairman and ceo find out more about the quarter. good to see you. all right this was a very interesting thing this quarter. you had already told people that you thought you could beat the number. you had four cents more than anybody thought. was it the strength of the consumer here. is it how much better europe is for you? >> what is the make up of that last bit? >> margins were better. we were being on the gross margin line. better with taxes and overall, this quarter given the warnico acquisition we were forced more or less to come out and give guidance and we took it up. so it was a strong quarter for us. one of the things, and i know it is not as important, but your heritage brand, 3% increase, this is a major change, it is in the middle of a tr
smart and this business has become a terrific secular growth story. and the underlying economy ain't doing so hot. this new trimble is all about helping customers become more productive and more efficient, antidote for this low growth economic environment. it uses proprietary technology, collect data from other measurement technologies and it processes that data that's designed to tell the customers what's needed to improve efficiency of workers out in the field. especially at construction sites and new infrastructure builds. those software builds can cut fuel costs or improve customers service or safety standards. it all comes down to helping other companies to find new ways to squeeze more money out businesses. that's the kind of pitch that never goes out of style. certainly not one that the old trimble could have offered. it's a joint venture with cat pilller where their technology will be sold to cat dealerships for everything to machine control technologies. this gives the company a tremendous outsource international sales force. it looks like it's become the real deal. compan
people are flying. another reason is because of the economy, some people are saying i'm going to hold off in terms of booking a flight especially because fares are not dropping. because there's limited capacity. the airlines have been able to hold fares at a fairly consistent level. they are down according to aa compared to last year. still, you won't find too many bargains unless you're looking for last minute deals to nontraditional places. one other thing, guys, as we take a look at rental car stocks, you've heard a lot of stories over the last couple of days. it's true. if you were looking to rent a car in the northeastern united states, which some people do during the holiday weekend, good luck because most of them are already spoken for. this is the carryover effect from superstorm sandy. so many cars were damaged, destroyed during the storm. as a result, rental cars have been tight for some time in the northeastern united states. and that's the case this weekend. a lot of people, believe it or not, guys, they do like to rent a car in order to make the trip of 300 or 400 miles. this
us a lot about the state of the consumer and the u.s. economy today. so we're turning to one of the most seasoned and respected voices on wall street for help. we have dana telsey. she is our guest host for the next three hours. andrew, i'll send it over to you. >> we begin with a visit to toyland and here is toys r us. it opened its doors at 8:00 last night. and we have toys r us ceo joining us right now from the company's flagship store in times square. good morning. >> good morning. >> so i read a report you you had a big line. what's it been like all evening? >> it's been great. we did have a big line. we're at 44th and broadway.line went all the the way to 45th street and then down 45th all the way to 6th avenue. it was huge. people came in in a real celebratory mood. people ate ice cream, relaxed with their kids. i've never seen a black friday like this before, but 8:00 hour worked really well for families. >> let's talk about sales. how did it go overnight? >> we're just starting. this is 5:00 a.m. on black friday morning. we're really just starting. we have about a b.
on the fiscal cliff, chances are we get a slower economy next year because of the higher taxes and cutting spending? >> i want to touch on something that liz just said. i have tried to get her to play along with this game. >> i gave up long ago. >> she always resists me when i try to pin her down on the number. i guess she's smart. as you mentioned, a fellow from morgan stanley coming out saying, look, i blew it. it's a pain for me. i don't want to do this. i think what they're banking on is this whole fiscal cliff thing, the europe thing. all of the head winds for the market are never going to see the worst case scenario. i think just kind of the picture is this muddle through going forward. i called up today and tried to -- i talked to some of the most bearish people i know. they're all just kind of saying, yeah, we're going to muddle through. the fiscal cliff is going it get resolved one way or the other. europe is going to get resolve one way or the other. i think this is one of -- >> steve, he brings up a good point. consumers are not worried about the fiscal cliff. intraday trading t
on the oil industry. we want it to help us, you know, to develop our economy and to develop the economy of the world. so what is good for the well-being of saudi arabia should be good for the well-being of the world too. so there's nothing wrong with that. >> and so what do you say to people out there like al gore and now mr. obama that say we have to devote ourselves-- devote ourselves to reducing our dependence on oil? >> my answer to this is, we have to be realistic. we don't have the alternatives today. if there are alternatives, be my guest and come and bring them in. but they are not there. >> you're saying whatever the world does in terms of wind, nuclear, coal, we're still gonna need oil, and a lot of it, no matter what? >> you're still going to need oil and a lot of it. >> politicians use this all the time that we're "addicted," addicted to foreign oil. and addiction has a dark connotation, because if you're addicted, there's a suggestion that there's a drug dealer who's trying to keep you hooked. it's in the air that you want to keep us hooked. >> there is nothing addictive ab
that 15% to 20% of all goods in china are counterfeit. >> and these days, the way china's economy is booming, 15% to 20% means tens of billions of dollars. evidence of the counterfeiting trade can be seen at this hong kong warehouse where counterfeit watches, shoes, computer chips, all copied in china, and seized in hong kong, are tossed onto a conveyor belt, and consigned to the dust bin of history. but it's like stopping the rain, the seizure may look impressive, but every day, 6,000 shipping containers leave hong kong's harbor for the u.s. packed with products made in china, and only a small fraction of those containers are ever inspected. >> this is the most profitable criminal venture, as far as i know, on earth. >> counterfeiting. >> counterfeiting. and your partners don't kill you. >> attorney harley lewin has been chasing counterfeiters from china for more than twenty years. and china's now the undisputed capital of the counterfeit. >> 80% or more worldwide. >> can you give me an example of any american or european product that's manufactured here without being counterfeit
the economy isn't able to handle the tax increases and spending cuts. we know those comments caused the bulk of the intraday pullback. the market was humming along fine. we did in the end rebound nicely. it was a huge victory for the bulls. the losses, regardless of the cliff and it's aftermath, we need to head off the personal portfolio management errors before they cost another dime for us. today we got two phenomenal examples of what could go wrong in banking. first we had hewlett-packard. if you are like me, i have both and hp pc and household printer. to finish at $11.71. best buy. the big box retailer, i have not once but twice done in the last six months. closed at $11.96. two household names that you may have been lured into only to have your hopes dashed. two unmitigated disasters. >> the house of pain. >> what went wrong? hewlett-packard was an accounting scandal. best buy was a hideous earnings shortfall. both seemed to shock investors. however, if you watch this show, you should never have been in these stocks. or you were betting against them. i told you that these companies wer
's a wonderful point. longer term you are looking at the united states economy doing better than not bad. it will grind along. we're not calling it for a double dip recession in 2013. we think fiscal cliff will be resolved in large part. creating opportunity if you have done your homework and you have long-term discipline, use vo volatility to your advantage. great cash position. europe has good companies. china will stimulate. not like in 2009 but it will be there. i think the death of equities and u.s. market is greatly exaggerated. you do have to do your homework because short-term volatility will give you opportunities and challenges. >> after what we hear this weekend, does it make sense to focus on discretionary going into year end? >> it does. it has coming into the third and fourth quarter. again, pick your battles. understand what you're getting into. name specific analysis is critical. build that portfolio. look globally. it's more than just a u.s. story. looking into europe, emerging markets if you have a longer term time horizon. commodities. all of these things are going to
-pinching scrooge when they wanted beneficent santa claus. >> we had katrina. we had a down economy. now we got the spill. you can't tell me one person that has not suffered. why don't you open up the purse strings? >> here's my answer. [applause] don't trust my words. my words--you've heard a lot of talk. let's just see, over the next few weeks and months, have i delivered on my promise to help people in mississippi? >> ever since the deepwater horizon blew, it was clear that this was a disaster in the making. the fishing industry came to a stop. tourism was wrecked. the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands, anyone who was dependent on these waters, were in deep jeopardy. under pressure from the federal government, bp agreed to create a victims compensation fund. both bp and the white house wanted one man, ken feinberg, to administer it. >> i felt that if asked, i should step up and try and help as best i can. >> what is it about ken feinberg that makes him the nation's arbiter of impossible decisions? >> i think there's something that experience brings to the table in terms of getting these p
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